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View Full Version : Why are Fryette amps so dry?



bleed
01-15-2010, 11:01 AM
I mean, technically, whats the reason for their dry character. Why are they not as saturated as Mesa, ENGL and most other hi gain amps?

Is it tubes/bias, pre-amp, power-amp, whats the "secret"?

Racerboy44
01-15-2010, 11:34 AM
I don't think "dry" is even the right word. They are just very clean. The notes don't have any buzz or mess attached to them which most amps have. I also wonder what Fryette does differently.

Giga
01-15-2010, 12:23 PM
Good question. It's really unfortunate there are so few VHT schematics available. Makes it much more difficult to get an idea on how the amp is build up.

Giga

SteveVHT
01-15-2010, 07:38 PM
I think what most people call "dry" is actual clarity of the signal. Most high gain amps have so damn much noise in the signal path that they are referred to as saturated.
Since I started playing through Fryette amps, I have found that my playing has gotten better due to the fact that a ton of noise is not covering up my mistakes. I also find myself turning down the gain on other high gain amps which I would have normally cranked.
In almost every high gain amp I play now, when nothing is being played, there is so damn much background noise, whereas with the Fryettes its like being plugged into a clean amp even with high gain settings.
But that is just my unedjumicated opinion....LOL

Cam
01-15-2010, 09:00 PM
I guess thats Steve s eleven secret herbs and spices :twisted: that makes it finger lickin good

Racerboy44
01-16-2010, 02:10 AM
I think what most people call "dry" is actual clarity of the signal. Most high gain amps have so damn much noise in the signal path that they are referred to as saturated.
Since I started playing through Fryette amps, I have found that my playing has gotten better due to the fact that a ton of noise is not covering up my mistakes. I also find myself turning down the gain on other high gain amps which I would have normally cranked.
In almost every high gain amp I play now, when nothing is being played, there is so damn much background noise, whereas with the Fryettes its like being plugged into a clean amp even with high gain settings.
But that is just my unedjumicated opinion....LOL

I completely agree. It's just a very clean signal.

cdtbeast
01-16-2010, 10:32 AM
The Fryette & Diezel amps are super clean with their preamp distortion & that is what you pay for.

rbone100
01-16-2010, 10:39 AM
Bingo......


The Fryette & Diezel amps are super clean with their preamp distortion & that is what you pay for.

Giga
01-16-2010, 10:51 AM
The Fryette & Diezel amps are super clean with their preamp distortion & that is what you pay for.

But how do they achieve this; component choice, the way the circuit is build up, voltages

Inquiring minds want to know...

I'd like to go over a SIG with someone far more knowledgeable as I am to learn something.

Especially the way they build in the awesome touchsensitivity is something I'm very interested in

Giga

richedie
01-16-2010, 10:54 AM
How about Bogner? I find them as wlel made but much more juicy/saturated, etc. I think if I could have a Bogner Shiva, Diezel Einstein, and VHT of some sort, I'd be good for a loooooong time. :-D
I'd have to sell my Egnater Mod 50 to do that however. Speaking of which.....my mod 50 is very quiet, but not quite as quiet as the VHT ST/50 I own. For me, between my Mod 50 and ST, it is more about gain stages. The VHT ST has less gain stages so it is quieter. I don't find my Mod 50 any noisier than the UL I had.....and the gain character was definitely more stiff on the UL. A big part to me is EL34s. I must have EL34s in any amp I own so that I think is why I have fallen for the ST/50.

cdtbeast
01-17-2010, 01:20 PM
The Fryette amps are very touch sensitve in tone & volume & have great tone. Great if you want an amp that react to every strike & varying pressure of the pick, both the volume & tone are reactive & can be manipulated. No compression.

The Diezel amps are touch sensitive with tone but less so with volume. They have compression. Great tone also. Good amp if you want the tone to manipulate with your picking without the volume changes.

richedie
01-17-2010, 11:11 PM
Sometimes I like the VHT thing and sometimes I prefer a more saturated, creamier Bogner type gain so I have an Egnater as well.

SkaakS
01-18-2010, 12:43 AM
Well, technically speaking, one of the biggest contributors to the more compressed sound of the Bogner is the fact that the power supply voltage for the preamp tubes is relatively low compared to other amps. The supply voltage for the XTC preamp tubes is around 250-300V, compared to the 350-400V supply voltage for an amp like a SLO. These lower voltages result in the response curves of the tubes being 'squashed' together in such a way that there's less variance in output for the same amount of input variance. In other words, higher and lower input signal result in a less dramatic change in output compared to an amp with higher supply voltages. Obviously there are a lot of othe differences, but that was the first one that jumped out at me.

VHT amps, on the other hand, tend to have fairly high supply voltages, especially for the power tubes. KT88s alone have a ton of headroom, but when you couple that with the ridiculously high voltages that they run on (>500V), you end up with a ridiculous amount of headroom which results in a very 'clean' signal.

VHTs also have several other circuit configurations which seem to be fairly uncommon in high gain amps, mainly parallel triodes for the first gain stage and a cathodyne phase splitter. I would say that the parallel triodes is probably a larger contributor to the 'cleanliness' of the sound. Basically, a 12AX7 is actually made up of two amplification devices. In most amps, each half of the tube is used for a separate gain stage (i.e. 1A used for the first gain stage, 1B used for the second gain stage). In most VHTs, the first tube is actually wired in such a way that both halves are in parallel, thus giving this stage more headroom and less noise. Since the first stage of the amp is the very first thing that the input signal hits, it has a huge effect on the character of the amp. Not a whole lot of other amps seem to use these configurations, so I would guess that they have a lot to do with the unique sound of the VHT/Fryette amps.

Cam
01-18-2010, 02:29 AM
cheers for the educated answer... :twisted:

cdtbeast
01-18-2010, 11:15 AM
Cool answer.
Will be forwarding this to my amp tech.
Seeing as schematics are thin on the ground for my UL any info is a bonus.

bleed
01-18-2010, 06:04 PM
Well, technically speaking, one of the biggest contributors to the more compressed sound of the Bogner is the fact that the power supply voltage for the preamp tubes is relatively low compared to other amps. The supply voltage for the XTC preamp tubes is around 250-300V, compared to the 350-400V supply voltage for an amp like a SLO. These lower voltages result in the response curves of the tubes being 'squashed' together in such a way that there's less variance in output for the same amount of input variance. In other words, higher and lower input signal result in a less dramatic change in output compared to an amp with higher supply voltages. Obviously there are a lot of othe differences, but that was the first one that jumped out at me.

VHT amps, on the other hand, tend to have fairly high supply voltages, especially for the power tubes. KT88s alone have a ton of headroom, but when you couple that with the ridiculously high voltages that they run on (>500V), you end up with a ridiculous amount of headroom which results in a very 'clean' signal.

VHTs also have several other circuit configurations which seem to be fairly uncommon in high gain amps, mainly parallel triodes for the first gain stage and a cathodyne phase splitter. I would say that the parallel triodes is probably a larger contributor to the 'cleanliness' of the sound. Basically, a 12AX7 is actually made up of two amplification devices. In most amps, each half of the tube is used for a separate gain stage (i.e. 1A used for the first gain stage, 1B used for the second gain stage). In most VHTs, the first tube is actually wired in such a way that both halves are in parallel, thus giving this stage more headroom and less noise. Since the first stage of the amp is the very first thing that the input signal hits, it has a huge effect on the character of the amp. Not a whole lot of other amps seem to use these configurations, so I would guess that they have a lot to do with the unique sound of the VHT/Fryette amps.

Now we're getting somewhere, thanks for the info.

If anyone have more info, please chime in, it's very interesting. I've been thinking of this alot the past few months, since Fryette is completely unique, haven't heard or played any other amp that sounds like them.